The successes of maternal immunisation strategies against tetanus, influenza and pertussis have stimulated investment in the development of new vaccines with indications for use during pregnancy to confer protection to newborns during the early months of life.

This seminar reviews the rationale and evidence for existing vaccines currently recommended for pregnant women in many countries, provides an overview of new vaccines being developed for future implementation in the obstetrical population, discusses uptake and determinants of immunisation during pregnancy, highlights safety monitoring issues and discusses considerations for high-risk pregnant women.

Video resources
Slides and audio from the webinar are available below.
The session was chaired by Professor Kristine Macartney, NCIRS Director.

Speakers:

Dr Deshayne Fell
Deshayne Fell is a perinatal epidemiologist, appointed as Assistant Professor in the School of Epidemiology and Public Health at the University of Ottawa, Canada, and as a Scientist in the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute. Her research uses large, linked population databases and registries to improve our understanding of factors affecting maternal and infant population health. Her current focus includes influenza and pertussis immunisation during pregnancy and their relationship with birth outcomes and longer-term paediatric health outcomes; safety and effectiveness of maternal immunization; and epidemiological research methods.

Associate Professor Nicholas Wood
Nicholas Wood is a staff specialist general paediatrician and Associate Professor and Sub-Dean (Postgraduate Research) in the Discipline of Child and Adolescent Health at the University of Sydney. He holds an NHMRC Career Development Fellowship. He leads the NSW Immunisation Specialist Service and coordinates the Immunisation Adverse Events Clinic at The Children's Hospital at Westmead. He is interested in maternal and neonatal immunisation, as well as research into vaccine safety and the genetics of adverse events.

 

Last updated December 2018
NCIRS Seminar/Webinar Series